Auburn University is strongly committed to providing an environment free of all types of violence, including sexual violence.
 

Safe Harbor 334-844-7233

 

If you or a friend are a survivor of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking, Safe Harbor can connect you with supportive resources on and off campus. These may include medical services, counseling services, academic support, police, and/or student conduct.

Remember: If someone assaults you, it is never your fault. Let someone know so that you can get the support you need.

Quick referencesSexual AssaultDating and Domestic ViolenceStalkingHow to Help a Friend; Contacts
 

Sexual Assault

  • To get immediate assistance from emergency medical services and police, DIAL 911.
  • It may take time for your to fully realize what has happened, but in the meantime it is in your best interest to get help from professionals. They are there to support you and help you make informed choices.
  • Do not disturb any evidence, including that on your body. Do not bathe, brush your teeth, douche, clean fingernails, or change clothes. If going to the hospital, take a change of clothes with you.
  • The East Alabama Medical Center in Opelika has Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) nurses who are specifically trained in caring for survivors of sexual assault and collecting forensic evidence (sometimes referred to as a "rape kit").
    • Recognize that there is a limited amount of time during which police and forensic examiners can collect evidence.
    • You may think you don't want to have a forensic exam at the hospital, but the sooner after an assault this is done, the more likely it is that useful evidence will be collected.
    • You may decide later that you want to pursue charges against the attacker. Forensic evidence can help support your case.
  • Survivors have the option to report a sexual assault.
  • Safe Harbor can connect you with resources on and off campus.  These may include, but are not limited to, medical services, counseling services, academic support, police, student conduct and/or other support services.
  • Auburn University wants to ensure that all survivors are mentally, psychologically and physically supported. Medical care and counseling services are available. If living, academic, or other changes are needed, the university will assist in providing reasonable accommodations.

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Dating and Domestic Violence

  • No one deserves to be in an abusive relationship of any type. The abuse is not your fault. Help is available.
  • If you are in immediate physical danger, DIAL 911.
  • If you have been injured, you can go to the hospital or your doctor for medical attention.
  • Safe Harbor can connect you with resources on and off campus.  These may include, but are not limited to, medical services, counseling services, academic support, police, student conduct and/or other support services. 
  • Consider telling a supportive family member or friend what has happened. Friends and family may be able to offer support and resources.
  • Consider creating a safety plan, whether you are leaving or staying in the relationship. Auburn Police and/or AU Campus Safety & Security can help you develop a plan.
  • If your abuser is an Auburn University student, you may have the option of filing a charge against them for violation of the student conduct code through the Office of Student Conduct.
  • Legal action may be an option for you as well, such as requesting a restraining or protection from abuse order.  These court orders tell your abuser to have no further contact with you or your friends and family. 

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Stalking

  • If you are in immediate danger, DIAL 911.
  • File a police report. The police can assist you with understanding and taking action if the stalker has broken the law.  If you don't feel comfortable reporting it alone, you can ask a friend or Safe Harbor advocate to accompany you.
  • Trust your instincts. Don't downplay the danger. If you feel you are unsafe, there's a good chance you are.
  • Take threats seriously. Danger generally is higher when the stalker talks about harming themselves or someone else, or when a survivor tries to leave or end a relationship.
  • Safe Harbor can connect you with resources on and off campus. These may include, but are not limited to, medical services, counseling services, academic support, police, student conduct and/or other support services.
  • Develop a safety plan. Include things like changing your routine, arranging for a different place to stay, and having a friend go places with you. Decide in advance what to do if the stalker shows up at your residence, classroom, work, or somewhere else. Let your friends know how they can help you.
  • Don't communicate with the stalker or respond to their attempts to contact you.  Communicating with them will generally encourage them to continue.
  • Tell family, friends, and others you trust about the stalking and seek their support.
  • Keep evidence by documenting the stalking. When the stalker follows you or contacts you, keep a log of the time, date, place, and other details you may find of importance. Keep all emails, phone messages, text messages, Facebook or other social media messages, letters, or notes. Photograph anything of yours the stalker damages and any injuries they may cause. Ask witnesses to also write down what they saw. Keeping this information is very helpful if you decide to get a protective order or press charges.
  • Legal action may be an option for you as well, such as requesting a restraining or protection from abuse order. These court orders tell your stalker to have no further contact with you or your friends and family.

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How to Help a Friend

Most survivors of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking disclose their situation to at least one other person, usually a friend. If a friend confides in you, here are a few things to consider:

  • The most important thing you can do is to be supportive, listen and be non-judgmental. 
  • Although you may want to solve his or her problems, it is important to let survivors of sexual and intimate partner violence make decisions for themselves about how to handle their situation.
  • Some helpful phrases you might use when talking with a survivor.
    • I believe you.
    • It's not your fault. Nothing you said or did gave someone permission to treat you this way.
    • Your reactions are normal reactions to a horrible experience.
    • It's your decision whether to report the incident, leave the abusive relationship, or get further assistance. I am here for you no matter how you decide to proceed.
    • You are not alone. Millions of people are survivors of sexual or intimate partner violence.
  • Safe Harbor can provide support and connect your friend with resources on and off campus. These may include, but are not limited to, medical services, counseling services, academic support, police, student conduct and/or other support services.

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Contacts

 

EMERGENCIES DIAL 911
Safe Harbor Sexual Assault
Advocacy Services (24/7)
Phone: 334-844-7233
Web: www.auburn.edu/safeharbor
Title IX Office Phone: 334-844-4794
Rape Counselors of East Alabama
(24/7)
Phone: 334-705-0510
East Alabama Medical Center
(24/7)

Phone: 334-749-3411

Auburn Police Division
(24/7)
Phone: 334-501-3100, opt 1
Auburn Police Division
Crime Stoppers Tip Line
(Call or Text)
Phone: 334-246-1391