Available Life Science Technologies

Therapeutics, Diagnostics & Human Health

Current solutions for antimicrobial bandages have the disadvantages of extremely high cost, relative ineffectiveness, lack of biodegradability, and/or induced bacterial resistance. Auburn’s N-halamine-based system overcomes all of those issues, and thus should be a significant improvement to help control infections in patients and the spread of infection between patients. The technology can also be applied to other disposable non-woven products, such as wipes, tissues, filters and surgical clothing. 
Overview | US Patent Application

Protein assays involve simple "mix-and-read" steps, making them attractive for rapid, point of care settings. However, these assays suffer from high background in complex samples, making sensitive detection difficult. A method has been developed that removes background for these assays, allowing fast and sensitive detection in human serum and plasma. 
Overview | PCT Patent Application

These antiviral compounds have demonstrated activity against several human viruses including Ebola, human cytomegalovirus, norovirus, and dengue fever, with the potential to inhibit other, untested viruses. They can be used therapeutically or preventatively against substantial outbreaks. 
Overview | U.S. Patent Application

Traditional vaccines use a high dose of antigen to elicit an antibody response, which is ineffective against many intracellular diseases. This technology uses an extremely low dose of peptides from the target disease, creating a T-cell response to provide improved protection. Further, the use of synthetic peptides allows for a lower cost and safer formulation than many existing vaccines. Numerous infectious diseases that lack sufficient (or any) preventative or therapeutic treatments are candidate targets, including tuberculosis, influenza, norovirus, dengue fever, malaria and many animal diseases. Cancers and autoimmune disorders could also be candidates. 
Overview | U.S. Patent 8,647,636 | U.S. Patent 9,107,875 | U.S. Patent Application

Most antibiotics are broadly acting, killing or preventing growth of both good and bad bacteria and opening the door for drug-resistant microbes to cause infection in an open wound. A probiotic bacteria has been shown to help prevent infection by multidrug-resistant Staph. aureus while keeping normal skin microbiota in place. Treatment of wounds with this probiotic could help prevent infection, aid in wound healing, and prevent development of antibiotic resistance.
Overview

There is a continuing need in point-of-care (POC) and clinical settings for more rapid and accurate testing to detect protein biomarkers of disease. Current methods of protein detection in bodily fluids can be costly, inaccurate, and time consuming. This technology yields quick, quantitative results with no significant sample preparation.
Overview | U.S. Patent 9,335,292

Heat stress can affect the body’s defenses and barriers to bacteria, allowing microbes in the gut to slip past and enter the blood, organs, or other areas and induce inflammation and other immune responses. A new probiotic has been shown to help maintain the integrity of the intestinal lining and block the movement of microbes from the gut into blood during heat stress. Such protection could be beneficial for athletes, workers, soldiers, animals, and others. 
Overview

This versatile drug delivery platform can control and modulate the release of a single therapeutic or multiple therapeutics in response to a variety of stimuli.  Small molecule drugs and nucleic acid therapeutics (e.g., RNAi) can be incorporated into injectable particulate or implantable drug systems in such a way as to release the drugs under certain conditions.  A single formulation can incorporate different drugs that are released at different rates. 
Overview | U.S. Patent Application

This new form of non-crystalline cellulose exhibits physical properties drastically different from a-cellulose and MCC. These unique properties include changes in morphology, surface area, porosity, crystallinity, bioavailability and water absorption. A patent has been issued for its use as a pharmaceutical excipient.  In vitro experiments have shown unique and desirable release characteristics which could improve formulations for certain drugs, including analgesics. 
U.S. Patent 7,977,473

There is a need for an easily assembled targeted drug carrier particle that has efficient assembly/conjugation, proper binding characteristics and can be efficiently produced on a large scale. This invention utilizes landscape phage proteins, which can be screened to specifically bind to a variety of targets, and their intrinsic ability to become spontaneously associated with micelles and liposomes. 
Overview | U.S. Patent 8,137,693 | U.S. Patent 8,252,324

This technology leverages the inherit properties of phage proteins to provide targeted delivery of nucleic acids to cells. Phage proteins, which naturally bind to nucleic acids in the native virus, are complexed with the nucleic acid to be delivered, such as an siRNA. This complex provides protection for the nucleic acid as well as a targeting mechanism via the biorecognition properties of the phage proteins. 
U.S. Patent 9,226,972

Proteon nucleating centers (PNCs) consist of 1- to 2-nm nanoparticles that contain 40–300 non-ionic metal atoms. These nanoclusters have been shown to scavenge misfolded proteins to form proteons: clusters of up to 100,000 protein molecules with metal centers. Thus, PNCs have tremendous potential in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases associated with misformed proteins, including prion-related diseases, neurological diseases, blood diseases and cancer.
Immediate non-exclusive licensing in most fields of use available through Auburn's Ready-to-Sign program 
Overview U.S. Patent No. 7,138,255 (Parent) | Video of glioma cells treated with PNCs

The p62 protein has been identified as the significant contributor to several metabolic pathways that lead to metabolic syndrome, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's and other related diseases. This invention provides a method for detecting the level (or absence of) the p62 protein as a diagnostic tool. A pharmaceutical composition is also contemplated for therapeutic supplementation. 
U.S. Patent 7,608,412

 

Biotechnology

Generating cardiac tissue provides the ability to study human cardiac physiology and drug responses in culture, and the potential to create cardiac cells for clinical therapies. However, current methods for working with these cells are expensive, time-consuming and can raise ethical concerns. A faster method for growing and differentiating adult human cells directly in a 3D environment has been devised that saves both time and money while generating high quality, mature cardiac tissue. 
Overview | U.S. Patent 9,587,221

Fragrances are used worldwide in many household consumables and foods to enhance taste and perception. In this research, zinc metal nanoparticles have been shown to enhance the response of olfactory tissue to odorants. Production of the nanoparticles is inexpensive and very little material is needed for a robust olfactory response. Addition of zinc nanoparticles to foods, perfumes, or other products could enhance consumer experience while cutting costs. 
Overview | U.S. Patent No. 8,273,381 | U.S. Patent No. 8,778,409 | U.S. Patent No. 9,132,086 

Osmotin, a protein derived from certain plants, has known antimicrobial, antifungal and therapeutic applications. Unfortunately, practical production levels have been elusive due to osmotin's growth inhibiting effects on the bacteria cultures designed to produce it. This novel approach solves this problem and may enable large scale production of the protein. 
U.S. Patent No. 8,357,509

These self-plasticizing copolymers allow for the assessment of a wide variety of ions without experiencing the negative effects of leaching, typically caused from using plasticizers. The key application for these sensors are for the detection of low levels of ions in bodily fluids for medical testing and research. 
Up to seven U.S. patents related to ion sensing are available for immediate non-exclusive licensing through Auburn's Ready-to-Sign program 

This patch clamp technique utilizes a laser source to generate a voltage across the membrane of target cells. This voltage generation allows for detailed studies of ion channel activity and throughput levels not currently achievable by other methods. This technology has potential applications in pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, neuroscience and nanotechnology.
Immediate non-exclusive licensing available through our Ready-to-Sign program 
Overview | U.S. Patent No. 7,807,042

Biological materials can be preserved for extended periods -- even at room temperature -- by simply adding an aqueous polymer solution and drying to a film. The sample can then be fully restored with water. This solves many of the problems with current preservation methods such as dehydration of the sample, expense, and use of cumbersome cryogenics or toxic materials.
Immediate non-exclusive licensing available through our Ready-to-Sign program 
Overview | Video of bacteria preservation and recovery after two weeks |  U.S. Patent No. 7,022,514 | U.S. Patent No. 7,473,550 | U.S. Patent No. 7,604,807

This work is the first demonstration of the use of landscape phage as recognition elements for biosensors. As superior substitutes for antibodies, phage exhibit many features such as high affinity, field stability, and low cost that show utility in a variety of real-time applications. 
Immediate non-exclusive licensing available through our Ready-to-Sign program 
Overview | U.S. Patent 7,670,765 | Related U.S. Patent: 7,138,238

This system and method for observing, collecting and analyzing olfactory characteristics of human or animal subjects produces data that can then be compared to various standards, providing a quantitative tool to study breathing patterns and quality. This technology has potential applications in clinical diagnostics and research tools, and has been exclusively licensed for canine-based detection. 
Overview | U.S. Patent No. 6,979,298

The widespread meat species adulteration found in heat-processed meat products and retail meat markets can have serious health consequences. These monoclonal antibodies are capable of meat species identification in raw and cooked meats and thus can detect species substitution. Additionally, they are useful indicators of end-point cooking temperature. 
Overview | U.S. Patent No. 6,288,215

 

Agriculture

Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) express and secrete enzymes that break down pectin and allow uptake of the resulting sugars. When pectin was added to a known PGPR in soybeans, measurements of plant growth were amplified up to five fold over use of the PGPR alone. Pectin is naturally derived, inexpensive, and should face minimal regulatory restrictions. 
Overview | PCT Patent Application

 

Veterinary

Traditional vaccines use a high dose of antigen to elicit an antibody response, which is ineffective against many intracellular diseases. This technology uses an extremely low dose of peptides from the target disease, creating a T-cell response to provide improved protection. Further, the use of synthetic peptides allows for a lower cost and safer formulation than many existing vaccines. Numerous infectious diseases that lack sufficient (or any) preventative or therapeutic treatments are candidate targets, including tuberculosis, influenza, norovirus, dengue fever, malaria and many animal diseases. Cancers and autoimmune disorders could also be candidates. 
Overview | U.S. Patent 8,647,636 | U.S. Patent 9,107,875 | U.S. Patent Application

With the global aquaculture market projected to grow 5% per year throughout this decade, control of disease outbreaks will become increasingly important. Because of inherent problems with overuse of antibiotics, alternatives need to be identified. These naturally occurring bacteria strains isolated at Auburn have been shown to control commercially relevant diseases in multiple species of fish. 
Overview | U.S. Patent 9,205,116 | U.S. Patent Application

Breakouts of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) in vaccinated chickens continue to cause millions in losses each year for the poultry industry despite worldwide vaccination efforts. A method has been developed that produces a uniform and protective vaccine that will help reduce the number of IBV outbreaks in commercially vaccinated chickens.
Overview | U.S. Patent Application

Over 40 million surgeries are performed annually on pets, resulting in owners administering pain killers once or more daily to ensure their pet is comfortable during recovery. This is inconvenient, challenging, and could enable substance abuse. A slow release injectable lasting 5-7 days has been developed to solve these problems. This formulation is designed to be given by the veterinarian immediately after surgery, and providing pain relief through the recovery stage for most minor surgeries.
Overview | U.S. Patent 9,566,241

The use of antibiotics as growth promoters is banned in Europe and is phasing out in the U.S., meaning new ways to control pathogens in food animals are needed. A bacteriophage cocktail has been developed that reduces Salmonella shed in the feces of calves. This approach represents an opportunity in a multi-billion dollar market to provide an alternative to antibiotics. 
Overview

Columnaris disease can affect nearly all freshwater fish and causes millions of dollars in annual losses for U.S. catfish farmers alone. An improved vaccine has now been developed using bacteria derived from a highly virulent strain. The vaccine has been shown to give superior protection to catfish and tilapia, and has possible applications in salmon, trout, and other farmed fresh water fish. 
Overview | U.S. Patent 9,161,972

Heat stress can affect the body’s defenses and barriers to bacteria, allowing microbes in the gut to slip past and enter the blood, organs, or other areas and induce inflammation and other immune responses. A new probiotic has been shown to help maintain the integrity of the intestinal lining and block the movement of microbes from the gut into blood during heat stress. Such protection could be beneficial for athletes, workers, soldiers, animals, and others. 
Overview