Creating a Deaf and a Hard of Hearing Friendly Classroom

  • Face the front of the class while speaking.
  • Provide student with front row seating.
  • Use visual aids when possible.
  • Provide student with copies of notes or powerpoints in advance.
  • Assist with the location of a notetaker.
  • Deaf and hard of hearing students are concentrating on reading signs, captioning, and reading lips, which make it difficult to look away and write notes. * A universal approach to learning would be to have a few volunteers take notes in class and have those notes posted on Canvas or something else, so all students could benefit from them.
  • Assist interpreters or stenographers by providing a list of frequently used or unique terms used in the course. This list can be emailed to the student.
  • Repeat any questions and answers from the students. If a deaf student ask or answer a question, they may use their sign language interpreter to voice their question or answer.
  • If the student is using an sign language interpreter, speak directly to the student and not the interpreter. Interpreters will sign everything you say. Keep in mind that American Sign Language (ASL) interpreters are about 1 to 5 seconds behind you as you speak.
  • Their interpretation is not a word for word translation.
  • Assist sign language interpreting with locating a seat with good lighting.
  • Students needing captioning will typically connect remotely to that stenographer
  • The first connection tend to be stressful on you, the student, and the stenographer.
  • Encourage the student to meet with you early to familiarize everyone with the technology. The typical setup will involve a student using a laptop or some type of mobile device, an amplification device worn by you, and a good connection to Auburn University’s wireless network.
  • Students just needing an amplification system will bring their equipment to class for you to wear. The improvement of hearing aids has lessened the need for portable listening devices, but in some cases it is still needed. If are teaching in a larger auditorium a amplification system will already be installed. In most cases this will be sufficient for the student, but in rare cases a different approach may have to be used.